Project manager interview questions must read

project-management-interview-questions

project-management-interview-questions

  1. 1.      What is the value of a project manager? The PM provides a central ‘control’ to plan, schedule, monitor and deliver a project. The PM must be able to assess risk and handle it. The PM must break complex projects into manageable sub-projects, assign responsibilities, and set milestones.
  2. What are the stages of project management on a project?  Projects are determined usually by a ‘sponsor’, a person within a company who defines the general goal of the project. The sponsor would then assign the project manager and inform the PM of the goals and restraints. In the first stage, the PM will discern all goals related to the central goal and discuss these goals with the team for feasibility. At the end of the stage, the PM issues a requirements document, confirming the sponsor’s plans and the specifics for the technical team. In the second state, the PM defines the tasks to be performed. IN stage three, the PM must determine and verify resource requirements – people, time, space, computers, software, money, and any other unique resources for the project. Stage four – the PM identifies risks and mitigation (backup) plans. A good PM can recognize parts of a project that could go awry and will plan ahead on how to handle them. Stage five is to develop a schedule. This is often done in Microsoft Project or Excel. In stage six, the team executes the schedule; the PM monitors and assists to keep everything on schedule. Stage seven – finish the project, wrap it up, then assess the performance.
  3. What would you consider the most important aspect of a project?  I would choose scope. The scope of the project needs to be determined and put down in writing at the very outset of the project. The PM must then make sure that “scope creep” doesn’t occur during the project. Sometimes the client, during the progress of the project, sees more things s/he wants to add to the project. To agree to this would throw off the timing and the budget, so such suggestions should be tabled for later update ideas. The technical team also can lose sight of the scope of the project and start developing on a tangent. Again, it is up to the PM to nip these digressions in the bug and get the team back on the right track.
  4. What occurs during the planning stage? Precise tasks to be performed must be identified and assigned to re person(s) responsible. Criteria for determining the successful completion of each deliverable are defined. Risk analysis is performed. Milestone reviews and a business plan developed in the initiation phase would be used to structure the planning. Stakeholders are identified, and the governance process is defined. An agreement is reached on reporting frequency and channels.
  5. What is the PM’s role during execution of the project?  A good PM has working knowledge of the tasks to be performed by the team. At regular  intervals, the PM should monitor progress to ensure that tasks are getting completed and milestones are being met. If there is a problem, the PM should find a resolution or turn the team to Plan B as soon as possible.  If a task has a need for ore resources not planned on and the PM agrees with the need, the PM needs to find those resources. The PM should provide documentation or ensure that documentation is provided all along the project steps.
  6. What is a project charter?  Called by a few different names, this is a formal document. It gives the project manager the authority to conduct the project within the scope, quality, time, cost and resource conditions stated in the document. It often includes the background of the project, the goal of the project, the objectives, the benefits, purpose, assumptions and constraints. It may even include a mission statement.
  7. What is a Deming wheel?  Also called the PDCA (plan, do, check, act) Cycle, is a model for continual process improvement. This is a good way to approach problems that arise during a project. You identify a problem and break it down to smaller problems. Select a smaller one to be changed, define the method and solution, establish metrics to measure success. This is the Plan phase. In the Do phase, you set up a prototype to experimentally test the proposed change. Check phase – evaluate the tests done in the Do phase against benchmarks. Act phase – implement the proposed changes if the tests are evaluated as being successful.
  8. What is change managements?  Even in small companies, a change in the technology can affect many peripheral areas of the company. If a project is going to entail down time of a regular system or database, the changes should be evaluated as to whether the project is well planned and executed. In large companies, this evaluation is done by a change management committee. This committee would hear the proposal to decide if it is worth the inconvenience; they would then determine its urgency, the backout plan, and the actual time when the change would be implemented. Good change management also means informing users of when and how the change will occur. After deployment, the committee may request a lessons-learned meeting before closing the project.
  9. What is a Gantt chart?  This is a type of bar chart which is very popular for informing the client of a project’s progress. It allows the client to see the timeline of the project events, where they overlap, which ones are complete, which are in progress and which are not started. There are tools which can generate Gantt charts, such as Excel and Project, but a PM can use any method to produce it. A Gantt chart can be expanded to show every task of a project, or minimized to only show milestones.
  10. What are KPIs? Key Performance Indicators are insights into the scope of the project and provide the project manager with criteria for determining success of the project. KPIs should answer the following questions: Is there a measurable way to determine if the project meets the scope and goal? Is the project aligned with the company’s objectives? Does the project description and scope prove to be a way to get acceptance from the clients? Are the objectives based on the client requests and are they prioritized? Can critical decisions be made based on the KPIs?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.